Home | Aquarium Equipment (page 2)

Category Archives: Aquarium Equipment

Feed Subscription

Includes articles on new aquarium product spotlights, guides, or detailed reports on product effectiveness in aquariums.

The Best Aquarium Filters for Goldfish

Comet

Uploaded to Wikipedia Commons by Heptagon

Although goldfish made their debut as pets over 2,000 years ago, their needs are not always understood by those new to fish-keeping.  Because the average pet store goldfish is small and inexpensive, they are sometimes viewed as “beginner’s pets” that need little care.  Add to this the fact that many people remember “Grandma’s goldfish that lived for years in a tiny bowl”, and it’s easy to see why most meet untimely ends (well-cared for goldfishes can live into their 20’s – and sometimes to twice that age!).  Folks who buy a single goldfish usually do not want to be bothered with a filter, but the lack of filtration is by far the main reason for failure with these otherwise hardy fishes.  However, there is a filter that needs no pad or carbon changes, and which becomes more effective with age – custom made for busy, “filter-shy” fish enthusiasts.  Today we’ll take a look at it and other simple options that will lessen your workload and improve your goldfish’s quality of life.

 

Goldfish Do Not Stay Small!

When considering a goldfish, it’s important to realize the potential size your pet will reach.  Goldfish are available in a wide variety of colors, 4 tail-shapes, 3 body-shapes and 3 eye-types, but are all of the same species, Carassius auratus auratus.  Those known as comets – the basic pet store or “non-fancy” goldfish – can easily reach 8-12 inches in length.  Sixteen-inch long individuals have been recorded; in fact, I have seen several feral goldfishes near that size in the Bronx River, mixed in with breeding aggregations of carp (I must check if hybridization is possible…).  Fantails, moors and other strains tend to be shorter in length than comets, but they get quite hefty.

Veil Tail

Uploaded to Wikipedia commons by Bechstein

 

True, improperly-kept goldfishes will become stunted, and may survive in that state for several years, but this is not to be encouraged – and certainly not a lesson to be teaching the children for whom single goldfishes are often purchased.  When fully-grown, your pet will need a 20 gallon aquarium in which to live; plan on a 30 gallon for a pair.

 

The Ultimate Goldfish Filter

Although now largely-ignored by hobbyists, (perhaps they are “too simple”!), undergravel filters were once considered indispensable by serious aquarists, and are still relied-upon by many public aquariums today.  In zoos and at home, I’ve used these highly-effective filters in aquariums housing creatures ranging from seahorses to alligator snapping turtles, always with great results.

 

t204151gWhen considering undergravel filters, it’s important to bear in mind that biological filtration – the breakdown (by aerobic bacteria) of ammonia to nitrites and nitrates – is the most important function of a filter (please see article below).  And it is at this aspect of filtration that undergravels excel.  Simply-put, an undergravel filter turns your aquarium’s substrate into a giant, living, biological filtration unit.  What’s more, the filter plate does not take up important living space and, being hidden below the gravel, allows for the creation of pleasing aquascapes.  Best of all, there are no cartridges or filter mediums to clean or replace! 

 

Water Changes

Regular partial water changes are essential to maintaining water quality and fish health…regardless of tank size, filtration method, or fish species.  When doing partial water changes, be sure to use a manual or battery-operated gravel washer.  In this way, you will remove debris trapped in the substrate along with the water…that’s all the maintenance your undergravel filter will need!

 

Black Moor

Uploaded to Wikipedia Commons by ﻯναოթ€ռ

Currents

Undergravel filters have another characteristic that suits them well for use with goldfish.  Goldfish evolved in slow-moving waters, and they cannot abide fast currents; fantails, lionheads and other round-bellied varieties are especially-weak swimmers.  Yet they produce a good deal of waste, and do best in aquariums equipped with powerful filters (which usually put out strong outflow currents).  Undergravel filters discharge clean water through two tubes that reach to the water’s surface…even when very powerful air pumps are used, outflow currents remain mild.  You can check out a wide variety of air pump styles and sizes here; please post below if you need assistance in choosing a pump.

 

Increasing Your Filter’s Efficiency

Power heads can be used in place of air pumps if you need to increase water flow through the gravel bed.  You can also set up a reverse-flow system, which will lessen the amount of detritus that becomes trapped in the substrate; please post below for details.

 

Commercially-available aerobic bacteria (i.e. Nutrafin Cycle) can be used to jump-start your filter or to boost the beneficial bacteria populations that have developed naturally.

 

Other Goldfish Filters

From simple corner filters to state-of-the art canisters, there is a huge array of other filtering options for goldfish owners.  Please share your thoughts and experiences by posting below.

Further Reading

Aquarium Filtration: Understanding the Nitrogen Cycle

Making the Most of Undergravel Filters

Aquarium Decoration Ideas – Fish Bowl Designs & DIY

Our first blog on Do-It-Yourself aquarium decoration ideas seemed to get so many creative juices flowing that we’re back with some more ideas, tips and examples. In the first blog, we covered some general ideas for how to look at different objects as possible aquarium decorations. This time, we’re going to get more specific based on some of the most common questions from your fellow hobbyists. I created a few different looks after raiding my kitchen cabinets for inspiration using a 2-gallon glass aquarium and a 1-gallon glass bowl but you can adapt the same ideas to aquariums of any size.

Hershey Bears Betta Bowl

Hershey Bears Fish BowlI’m personally a huge hockey fan and have done an NHL Philadelphia Flyers-themed betta in the past using gravel and a plant in their colors. For this one, I kept it pretty simple and used a glass pint glass I had for our local AHL team and my personal favorite, the Hershey Bears, as well as some plant substrate in different shades of brown. Since the logo on the glass is pretty solid, I left the glass empty except for some substrate in the bottom. The glass is sitting on the bottom of the bowl itself and I added the substrate around it to keep it in place. Read More »

The Best Holiday Gifts for Aquarium Owners, Tropical Fish Hobbyists & Fish Geeks

Today I’ll highlight some fish-keeping items that I’d be pleased to give or receive as holiday gifts. For the most part, I’ve focused on Reverse Osmosis Systems and Ultraviolet Sterilizers, both of which lessen our workload while enhancing fish and invertebrate survival.  I was first introduced to these tools while working in zoos and public aquariums, and am happy to see that reasonably-priced models are now available for home use.

tPG01062Reverse Osmosis Systems

I first began working with reverse osmosis (RO) systems about 15 years ago, while trying to correct water quality problems that plagued the amphibian collection at the Bronx Zoo.  Those I used were effective, but also huge, complicated, and difficult to maintain…I hated them!  Today’s home units are much more user-friendly; instruction manuals are posted online (please see links to individual products below), and customer support is readily available.
Read More »

Actinic Light vs. Blacklight – Highlighting Fluorescent Livestock and Decor

Glo tetrasWith the growing popularity and availability of fish like GloFish and GloTetras and decorations like our own Pure Aquatic Glow Elements line, “glow-in-the-dark” and fluorescent aquariums are becoming more and more common. Most of these animals and decorations are brightly colored in any light but under special lighting, the colors will really glow. There are two main kinds of light that are used in these aquariums: “blacklights” and actinic lights. Knowing the difference between these two can play an important role in making your tank really stand out, as well as in keeping it healthy. For this blog, we will be focusing in general terms only for community aquariums. Aquarium with invertebrates and corals will have different needs since their light requirements are much more specific and extensive.

First, the science…

The colors we see around us come from the light’s wavelength, measured in Terahertz (THz) or nanometers (nm). Most people can see light ranging from about 700nm (reds) to about 400nm (purples). Blacklights and actinic lights both produce light from the bottom of the visible light spectrum (the BIV in ROY G BIV). Most actinic lighting for aquariums has a wavelength of about 420-460nm. The higher end of this range (460nm) produces a more blue color light, while the color shifts to purple approaching the lower end (420nm). This type of lighting is still well within what we are capable of seeing. “Blacklights” emit a light below what we as humans are able to see known as ultraviolet or UV light. Yes, this is the same UV light that we wear sunscreen to protect ourselves against! UV lighting is separated into three major ranges. Blacklight bulbs are UV-A bulbs (315-400nm), the spectrum which causes our skin to tan. For comparison, the UV Sterilizers popular in aquariums for eliminating algae, diseases and parasites are UV-C bulbs (200-280 nm), a destructive spectrum that is mostly filtered out by Earth’s atmosphere and the UV-B range in between is the more damaging rays from the sun that causes sunburn and other harmful conditions. Read More »

Product Review – Bubble Magus Curve 7 Protein Skimmer

Bubble Magus 7Marilyn Monroe; Tyra Banks; Kate Upton; and now, Bubble Magus. What do they all have in common? CURVES! I’m talking, of course, about the seductive Curve series of skimmers from Bubble Magus. What makes these vixens of skim different, is a dramatically curvy body that builds on the already popular cone skimmer design. This allows the skimmer to perform even better, as the microbubbles take a turbulent-free ride up its serpentine sides. The SP2000 pump is conveniently placed inside of the body, keeping the Curve 7 protein skimmerfrom taking up too much real estate in your sump. The bottom of the skimmer also features a mysterious red plug, which I later found out was to be used if you decided to upgrade or replace the current pump with a different brand, like Sicce. The plug pulls out and allows for differently configured pumps to fit nicely into the body of the Curve. Then you just plug the hole left by the former pump, making the Curve very, very versatile. Read More »