Category Archives: Corals

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Artificial Reefs: Go Big or Go Home

 

artificial reef

Artificial reefs have been used by fisherman for hundreds of years for attracting fish, providing structure, and allowing more fish to be caught easily.  These traditional reefs were typically made from submerged logs that were tied together, or some other simple object.  Shipwrecks sites have also long been used for fishing areas, because of all the fish that they attract.

In modern times, the use of artificial reefs has exploded, and large scale reefs are being used for a variety of reasons, including improving commercial fish stocks by increasing habitat for small fish, sport fishing , recreational SCUBA diving, and wave attenuation and beach erosion control for coastal communities.  There is even a television reality show called Reef Wranglers on the Weather Channel, which features one of the most prominent builders of Artificial reefs in the US, Walter Marine.  Use of Artificial Reefs in tropical waters of the world can also have an impact on the aquarium hobby, they attract all kinds of fish and invertebrates, and can be  used for structure in farming corals.

World’s Largest Artificial Reefs

U.S.S. Oriskany

U.S.S. Oriskany during service.

Oriskany Tower

U.S.S. Oriskany in its new home

The title for World’s Largest Artificial Reef is currently held by the State of Florida, with the sinking /Reefing of the U.S.S. Oriskany.  The Oriskany is an Essex Class Aircraft Carrier commissioned in 1950, and served in both the Korean and Vietnam Wars.  Decommissioned in 1976, the Oriskany began its new life as an artificial reef in 2006.  After extensive preparation for environmental safety, the 900 ft vessel was intentionally sunk of the coast of Pensacola Florida, where she now sits upright at a depth of about 215 ft.  Dubbed the “Carrier Reef”, in honor of Australia’s Great Barrier Reef, the massive ships tower reaches to about 70 ft from the surface, making it a popular diving and fishing site.  There are many great videos available on youtube about the Oriskany, here is one of the sinking.

 

 

 

 

kan-kanan

Giant crane lifting Artificial Reef modules into place during Kan-Kanan project.

 

 

The U.S.S. Oriskany won’t be the biggest artificial reef for long.  Currently under construction in the State of Quintana Roo Mexico, is the massive Kan-Kanán project, known as the Guardian of the Caribbean.  When completed, the Kan-Kanán reef will stretch for 1.9 km (1.18 miles) along the coast of the Yucatan Peninsula.  Constructed from over a thousand individual concrete pyramids, each weighing 10 tons, the reef is being put in place to help try and stabilize the local fish populations, as well as control beach erosion that has been occurring due to climate change and environmental degradation from human activities.  From above, the reef will look like a giant serpent that stretches along the coast, which is where its name comes from.  Kan-Kanán is Mayan for “Protecting Serpent”.

 

Fear not Floridians, you may not lose your title as owner of the world’s largest reef for long.  Announced earlier this year, Collier County Florida will be the future home of an enormous reef project. Using funds established in the wake of the BP oil spill disaster in the Gulf of Mexico, along with local governments, and Non-Profit organizations, the Planned reef will consist of six 500 ton reefs, each the size of a football field.  More funding is still needed, and can be made as a tax deductible contribution.  For a mere $100,000 you can even have one of the reefs named after you.

 

Some strange things have been used for Artificial Reefs.

Whatever you have visualized in your mind as an artificial reef, you are correct, no matter what you imagined.  An artificial reef can be made from most anything, so long as it poses no environmental threat.  And wow, have some strange things been used as reefs over the years, here are a few of my favorites.

New York City subway cars being dropped offshore from barge.

New York City subway cars being dropped offshore from barge.

Fish hiding out on RedBird Reef subway car.

Fish hiding out on RedBird Reef subway car.

New York City Subway cars.  The east coast of the United States is the final resting place for thousands of decommissioned subway cars.  Most folks probably don’t even know they are there, but offshore from the popular NJ, MD, DE and VA beaches lay a huge network of old subway cars.  Directly off shore from Indian River Inlet in Delaware is RedBird reef (named after the famous New York Subway RedBird subway cars) which has upwards of 700 cars alone.

 

Underwater VW

Anthroposcene Sculpture, MUSA Cancun

Silent Evolution, MUSA Cancun

Silent Evolution, MUSA Cancun

Statues and Sculptures.  The Mexican government commissioned British Artist  Jason de Caires Taylor to build the Cancun Underwater Museum.  Located with a Marine Park, this underwater museum features over 400 life size sculptures and statues ranging from a VW Beetle, to life size humans, to a small house.  One of the most famous underwater sculptures in the world, Christ of the Abyss, is located in Key Largo Florida, and is visited by thousands of scuba divers (and fish) every year.

Eternal Reef structure with marine life.

Eternal Reef structure with marine life.

You and Me. That’s right, you can have yourself made into an artificial reef.  Eternal Reefs, is a company that will take your cremated remains, and incorporate them into a concrete reef structure.  Many reef options and locations are available, not a bad way to spend eternity if you ask me, nice view.

Thanks for reading, until next blog.

Dave

Getting to Know Gorgonians

gorgonianGorgonians, also known as Sea Fans or Sea Whips, are beautiful and fascinating creatures found throughout the world’s oceans. These creatures are rather iconic, their branched or net-like structures adding a different dimension to a reef, swaying gently with the current.  Gorgonians are flexible, stationary cnidarians though they are very similar to soft corals. Individual tiny polyps form colonies in a variety of sizes and shapes. Some are stiff and erect, resembling the veins of a leaf, some resemble ribbons with polyps aligned on the edges, others look like plumes or are branched like trees. There are also single strand colonies and those that encrust on rock in thin sheets. They are often brightly coloured, purple, red, orange or yellow, and polyps may be white, brown, yellow or some other pale shade.

About Gorgonians

More than 500 described species of Gorgonian are found tropical and subtropical oceans around the world. More species are found in the tropical Atlantic that in other regions. They usually grow in shallow waters, though there are some species that grow in depths of more than 1000 ft. Shallow water species tend to be more flexible and broad to withstand currents while deeper water types grow tall, thin, and more rigid. They may grow anchored to solid surfaces like rock or coral, or they may “root” in loose gravel or sediment.  Gorgonian colonies are supported by an internal, ridid central skeleton covered with softer tissue that connects each polyp to the next to form the colony. The structure a gorgonian colony creates varies between species from a simple whip-like form to complex net-like fans that can be several feet tall and wide.

Gorgonians provide a secure home to many other maring species including brittle stars, bryozoans and hydrozoans. Pygmy seahorses (Hippocampus bargibanti) cling to several specific species and have adapted to blend perfectly with the colonies with color and texture specic camouflage.  You may also find tiny species of crabs, shrimp, gobies, blennies, and other creatures have also adapted to thrive amongst the polyps and branches of Sea Fans.

Choosing a Gorgonian

It’s important to recognize a healthy gorgonian when you’re ready to put one in your tank. Carefully examine your choices, looking for any signs of damage to the skin. Have the person helping you look gently turn each specimen in the water, so you can get a full look, and take notice of any damage, missing tissue, or flaking or peeling of tissue when the specimen is moving. Smell the water in the holding tank. If there is a noticeable odor, avoid the tank, as it may be sign that one or more of the gorgonians is rotting. Look for one with a thick, sturdy, uncut stem or base, and at least a few extended polyps.

Gorgonian Care

Care of gorgonians will vary greatly according to the species you acquire, and you should take care to research the variety before purchase to ensure that you can provide what it needs to thrive.  That being said, most of the common species available in the trade have relatively simple needs.

goby on gorgonian
When you place your new gorgonian in the tank, give it plenty of space where it can sway with the current, completely submerged and without touching other corals or surfaces. Be sure to orient your Sea Fan in good, strong, direct current to ensure they are exposed to plenty of food when it is added to the tank. The water flow will also provide the tissue with plenty of oxygen and keep the surface free of waste and debris. The specimen should be mounted upright and with plenty of light exposure.

Gorgonians are filter feeders. Each tiny polyp has eight tentacles used to catch phytoplankton and other tiny particles carried to them in the current. Many prefer to feed at night, so generally this is when you’ll see the polyps emerge. There are many commercial invertebrate food options available to offer gorgonians. You may also offer them tiny frozen foods like rotifers, cyclopeeze and baby brine shrimp. Administer a small amount of food to entice the polyps to open, then follow a short while later with a larger dose when the most of the polyps are extended.

Many Gorgonians are also photosynthetic, containing symbiotic algae in their polyps that provide a secondary energy source for the colony. Fro these species it is vital that strong light is provided. Photosynthetis species typically have brown or green polyps as opposed to those lacking pigmentation.  These species may grow rapidly when kept in ideal conditions, and periodic pruning may be required. See this article for detailed info on pruning and propogation.

Be aware before you purchase a gorgonian that many fish and inverts may see them as a new meal. Keep a watchful eye for crabs, snails, slugs and other predators that can quickly damage your fan. Gorgonians also play host to lots of other organisms, so don’t panic right away if you find tiny serpent stars, anemones or other creatures from your tank amongst the branches.

Gorgonian image referenced from wikipedia and originally posted by Nobgood
goby on Gorgonian image referenced from wikipedia and originally posted by Jenny (jennyhuang) from taipei

Choosing New Aquarium Lighting for Your Tank

aquaticlife T5HOThe choices for lighting your aquarium have never been so vast. Whether you are setting up a new aquarium, replacing an old light fixture, or adding to your existing light, there are many decisions to be made.  New technology, and improvements on older lighting methods, provide today’s aquarium hobbyist with a dizzying array of lighting choices for any aquarium. So, how do you choose? What is the best light for your aquarium?

Here are a few questions to ask yourself, to help you with the decision:

Is the light that you are looking for only going to be used on your current aquarium habitat, or are you planning on a more advanced aquarium in the future that may require a higher output light source? You may want to consider a stronger light than you need for your current livestock, as basic lighting may limit what you can keep in the tank down the line.   Read More »

2012 TFP NCPARS Fall Frag Swap and Customer Appreciation Sale

2012 TFP/NCPARS Fall Frag SwapI can’t believe it is mid-September already, and we are just a few weeks away from our Fall TFP/NCPARS frag swap. The Swap is on Saturday October 6th, during our weekend long Customer Appreciation Sale here at TFP.  The Fall Frag Swap, one of the biannual swaps we host with NCPARS, is shaping up to be a great event.  Our joint swaps have been growing and growing with each coming event, and have become one of the largest swap events on the east coast.  Our Winter Frag Swap this past January had over 400 attendees.  With the additional crowd that comes for our Customer Appreciation Sale event, this swap should be a very busy.

The Customer Appreciation Sale weekend includes all the deals we offer in October throughout the store, Plus some great deals that are for the Frag Swap and Sale weekend.  Weekend deals include 25% off all TFP livestock, Buy three get one free select salt bucket deals.  There will also be some sweet coupon deals on our October sale flyer for the sale weekend.  If you are not already on our retail flyer mailing list, you can still sign up for our email notifications from our TFP home page (just make sure you select notifications for our retail store in your preferences)fragsfrags for sale

 

 

 

 

 

 

For the frag swappers, there will be eye candy galore, from some of the best coral hobbyist on the east coast, including NCPARS own Dan Rigle who was recently featured in Coral Magazine.  Jason Fox, will be on hand, showing off some of his rare beauties.  TFP will have a nice stock of our own frags on hand, including a nice selection of ORA and ACI aquaculture coral.  For more information visit NCPARS Website to register for the event, or visit Fragswapper to see or list items for trade or sale.

 

 

salt bucketsOur Vendors have donated some nice items for the NCPARS raffle, including a 60 gallon reef ready cube tank, stand and Reef Capable LED light from Marineland and many other great items.

Aquatic Manufacturer Representatives will be on hand from; United Pet Group (Tetra, Marineland, Instant Ocean, Perfecto…….), Two Little Fishies, Seachem, Aquarium Pharmaceuticals, Reed Mariculture, Hagen, Ruby Reef

Pet Product Manufacturer Representatives will be on hand from; Merrick, Nature’s Variety, Blue Buffalo, Nutro, Nutrisource, Answers, Earthborn, Dogswell, Zukes, Marchioro, Pawganics, Multipet, A&E Cages.

There will be a little something for everyone, so bring the family, and join the fun.

Hope to see you here!

Dave

Current TrueLumen Pro LED Strips Now Available at That Fish Place

That Fish Place now has the latest LED strip lights from Current USA, the TrueLumen Pro Series.  The TrueLumen Pro LED lighting system is modular, easy to use, environmentally friendly, and extremely energy efficient. The strips are available in four sizes (12”, 24”, 36”, 48”) and four different color spectrums. These lights can be adapted to any aquarium setup, offering brilliant lighting for any set-up.

8,000K Sun White – Brings the color of natural sunlight into your aquarium, perfect for freshwater planted aquariums, marine refugiums, and general lighting purposes

12000K Diamond White – Crisp white light for excellent shimmer and light penetration,  coloration on freshwater and marine fishes, limits growth of nuisance algae.

Deepwater Blue – 453nm actinic blue color provides proper wavelengths for enhanced coral growth, and intensified coloration in corals and fishes.

Marine Fusion – Blend of the Diamond White and Deepwater Blue LED colors to provide an ideal single light source any marine or reef aquarium. Can also be used on freshwater aquariums to enhance fish colors.

TrueLumen Pro LEDs come with a mounting bracket, that allows them to be easily attached the inside of a canopy or solid surface for an easy retrofit.  Aluminum mounting legs are also available for a more traditional tank frame mount setup, or they can simply be set on top of a glass canopy. Available inline dimmers and splitters allow for a wide range of custom installation possibilities.

The aluminum housing of the TrueLumen Pro is also a heat sink, that allows for cool operation of the LED chips, which will give them long life, and high performance. LED chips are also sealed in crystal clear silicone protectant, keeping all the electronic connection protected from any accidental splashing or corrosive salt creep.

The DC transformer power supply is sold separately, and can power up to 6 TrueLumen Pro light strips with the use of the available three way splitters.

Whether you are looking to upgrade, or replace your old lighting, the Current USA TrueLumen pro LED strips are worth taking a look at, they may be just what you are looking for.