Keeping Our Fingers Crossed For the Gulf

Oli Spill Clean-upGiven the sad comedy of errors that have occurred on the BP Deep Water Horizon drilling operation in the Gulf of Mexico, a lot of people will have their collective fingers crossed this week, as the project for the permanent cap to the damaged well gets under way.  I don’t think that there is need to rehash all of the events leading up to this point, everyone directly affected by this disaster is fully aware of what has happened.  The New York times a great website detailing the repair efforts if you are interested. Read More »

Piranhas – Myth and Mystery Part 3 – Elongated Piranha

Elongated Piranha DrawingCraig here with another blog about yet another species of piranha. We have looked at the Red Belly and the Black piranha, now it is time to take a look at one of the most aggressive and predatory of all piranha species – the Elongated Piranha.

While many species have a similar and classic look to them, this species is physically unique. Serrasalmus elongatus, also known as the Slender or Pike Piranha, is a sleek predator from the waters of Venezuela and Brazil. Like many other piranha species, it has a shiny silver body with fearsome teeth. It is a highly active and highly motivated predator of other fish from the region. While the coloration and eating habits are similar to other piranha, it is the elongated shape of this fish that separates it from its cousins. Read More »

Bold Basslets

Chalk BassHello, Sam here with another small fish profile.  Fish from the group of known as the basslets are mostly small, solitary species that are great candidates for smaller tanks.  These fish are related to the much larger basses.  Two species of fish that I particularly enjoy from this group of fish are the Chalk basslet (Serranus tortugarum) and the Tobacco Basslet (Serranus tabacarius).  Both of these fish are found in the Caribbean and are normally imported around 3 inches in length. Read More »

From Fin to Leg – Did a Mutation Help Ancient Fishes Conquer Land?

Australian LungfishHello, Frank Indiviglio here.  If you stare long enough at a Lungfish or Mudskipper (as I have, often causing my co-workers to wonder…), it’s easy to picture a similar creature leaving an ancient sea and setting forth to explore the land in the distant past.  Indeed, evolutionary biologists tell us that a fish very much like today’s Australian Lungfish (Neoceratodus fosteri) did pull off such a feat some 360 million years ago, thereby setting the stage for the rise of the amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals.  Read More »

Another “D’oh!” Moment – The Eel Incident

After Jose’s blog in May about some of our coworker’s mishaps and misadventures, I’ve been badgered and teased (again) about what we refer to around here as “the eel incident”, one of my own prize foibles that Jose had forgotten when he wrote his blog. Since he wants to tell all of you anyway, here it is in my words….

Green Moray EelAlong the back wall of our fish room, we have two large coral tanks side-by-side. Now they are coral tanks, but at the time of this incident, we used them for particularly large or aggressive saltwater fish. In the smaller tank on the right, we had a green moray eel affectionally known as Captain who was about three feet long. The other tank had another eel that was about four feet long and was from the old incarnation of our 700 gallon display tank where it used to live with a huge Bumblebee Grouper named Buzz. That eel wasn’t named, so I’ll refer to it as eel B. Read More »